Shinzo Abe assassination: Japan’s national police chief to resign over failure to save former leader’s life

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National Japan’s police chief He announced on Thursday that he would step down to accept responsibility for the assassination of former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

National Police Agency chief Itaru Nakamura’s announcement came after his agency released a July 8 report on how it failed to save Abe’s life. Killing in a campaign speech at Nara in western Japan.

Nakamura did not say when the resignation would become official.

A police report found a hole in Abe’s police protection that allowed the alleged assailant to shoot him from behind.

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a press conference at the Prime Minister’s Official Residence on August 28, 2020 in Tokyo, Japan.
(Frank Robichon – Poole/Getty Images)

The The alleged gunman, Tetsuya Yamagami, He was arrested at the scene and is currently undergoing a psychiatric evaluation until the end of November. Yamagami told police he targeted Abe because of the former leader’s ties to the Unification Church, which he hated.

The weapon used to shoot Abe was a homemade gun, as it is suspected to emit a large amount of smoke after firing.

Former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe assassinated during a campaign speech

News of the former prime minister’s death caused global shock as Japan was ranked as one of the safest countries in the world to live in with its notoriously strict gun laws.

Gun violence has been extremely rare in Japan for decades following the 1958 law banning guns and swords.

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Japanese citizens can obtain firearms if they complete a 13-step program that requires them to join a hunting or shooting club and includes a thorough background and evaluation process.

Abe is Japan’s longest-serving prime minister, serving eight consecutive years since 2012.

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The hearse of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe leaves Zojoji Temple after his funeral on July 12, 2022 in Tokyo, Japan.  (Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images)

The hearse of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe leaves Zojoji Temple after his funeral on July 12, 2022 in Tokyo, Japan. (Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images)

His tenure was remarkable Not only because Japan’s electoral scene has historically seen relatively high turnover, but Abe’s first term ended abruptly after serving just one year, from 2006 to 2007, due to complications related to his ulcerative colitis, a chronic condition.

Abe’s family paid their respects in a private Buddhist ritual on Thursday, the 49th day since his assassination.

Caitlin McFaul of The Associated Press and Fox News contributed to this report.

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